Inchisoare pentru un fost angajat Microsoft care „scurgea” informatii!

by on 14/06/2014

Microsoft nu sunt scutiti in ultima vreme de necazuri „de imagine”. Cu ceva timp in urma au „controlat in mod absolut justificat”(spun ei) un cont de Hotmail pentru a investiga cum a aflat un blogger francez despre Windows 8 si de unde avea acesta screenshot-uri cu sistemul de operare, evident, inainte de momentul lansarii.

Problema pentru Microsoft a fost ca imaginile au ajuns pe net inainte de lansarea lui Windows 8, si ca Alex Kibkalo, angajatul cu pricina, a fost acuzat si de faptul ca a furat si distribuit un „Activation Server Software Development Kit”, software folosit pentru a combate pirateria (implicit si pe cea a Windows-ului). Bloggerul francez a distribuit kitul online, permitandu-le astfel si altora sa se sustraga de la activarea protectiilor create pentru Microsoft Office si Windows. Microsoft a reusit sa identifice angajatul care distribuia informatiile, dupa ce bloggerul francez a contactat un alt angajat via email pentru mai multe informatii.

Inbox-ul „scormonit” atunci, a indicat ca angajatul companiei este cel care a trimis informatii si screenshot-uri. Ceea ce este deranjant, este ca Microsoft nu a „cerut” vreun ordin judecatoresc pentru a intra in contul PRIVAT al bloggerului, iar persoana care a furnizat informatiile, Alex Kibkalo, a fost arestat si acuzat de furt. Acesta a pledat vinovat, primind o sentinta de trei luni de inchisoare.

Microsoft au declarat in urma incidentului urmatoarele:

„During an investigation of an employee we discovered evidence that the employee was providing stolen IP, including code relating to our activation process, to a third party. In order to protect our customers and the security and integrity of our products, we conducted an investigation over many months with law enforcement agencies in multiple countries. This included the issuance of a court order for the search of a home relating to evidence of the criminal acts involved. The investigation repeatedly identified clear evidence that the third party involved intended to sell Microsoft IP and had done so in the past.

As part of the investigation, we took the step of a limited review of this third party’s Microsoft operated accounts. While Microsoft’s terms of service make clear our permission for this type of review, this happens only in the most exceptional circumstances. We apply a rigorous process before reviewing such content. In this case, there was a thorough review by a legal team separate from the investigating team and strong evidence of a criminal act that met a standard comparable to that required to obtain a legal order to search other sites. In fact, as noted above, such a court order was issued in other aspects of the investigation.”

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